Toxins & Poisons

SIT Dog Training assumes no liability for the content on this page which has been attained from the internet and other sources and should only be used as a guide.

Please contact your veterinary practice immediately if you think your pet has ingested any of the plants or items referred to in the following lists and articles.

SEASONAL CANINE ILLNESS (SCI)

Seasonal Canine Illness is a mystery illness affecting dogs during the autumn, which can prove to be fatal. Cases are generally seen between August and November. SCI can affect dogs of any size, shape or sex and it causes dogs to become very ill, very quickly after being walked in woodland. Read more

ALERT! - Dec 02
A KILLER IN YOUR GARDEN!

(Reproduced from article seen in Seadown Veterinary Group Autumn Newsletter.)

A member of Seadown’s staff recently read of the death of a young, fit and healthy dog, which was totally avoidable, if only the owner had known!

A bag of cocoa shell mulch was spread on a garden, the type that is used as a mulch or weed inhibitor and is freely available from garden centres. This product has an odour, which is irresistible to some dogs, as it is basically chocolate.

A three-year-old Weimaraner bitch ate some and two hours later she was dead! The post mortem revealed the cause of death was the theobromine (see below) found in the cocoa shell in her stomach.

The packaging bears a small disclaimer, which says, “may be harmful to animals”, which hardly emphasises the seriousness of the risk.

Most people are now aware that human chocolate is a poison for dogs, the dark bitter kind being the worst, but who would think of cocoa mulch being so deadly.
BEWARE OF CHOCOLATE POISONING! Courtesy of The Kennel Club
Chocolate contains a substance called theobromine (see above), which is toxic to dogs. All chocolate and chocolate powders contain this substance, although some types of chocolate contain more than others - for instance, dark chocolate contains more than milk or white chocolate. Even relatively small quantities of chocolate, particularly dark chocolate or cocoa powder, can have serious effects, so it best to avoid giving chocolate to dogs altogether. (Doggy choc drops are of course entirely different and absolutely safe for your dogs.)

If your dog does manage to eat a quantity of chocolate, particularly dark chocolate or cocoa powder, you should seek advice from your vet.

Xylitol - Dangerous to dogs!

Xylitol can be found in sugar free gum.


Please contact your veterinary practice immediately if you think your pet has ingested any of the plants or items referred to in the above lists and articles.

 

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